This questionnaire is part of a 1997 experiment on how to create intimacy

The study ended with the marriage of two of the participants

It gained importance again after an article published in The New York Times

Mandy Len Catron published on January 9 an article in The New York Times (which we translate into Verne) and narrates how he fell in love with the help of 36 questions by psychologist Arthur Aron.

Although the writer used Aron's questions to fall in love and to fall in love with her, Aron put them in his study as a tool to generate intimacy, not necessarily loving, gradually. The aim was to help psychologists to create a close relationship in the context of a laboratory, so that it was possible to manipulate and study the variables of this relationship.

'How I Met Your Mother' would have ended sooner if he had used Dr. Aron's questions.
'How I Met Your Mother' would have ended sooner if he had used Dr. Aron's questions.

Mandy Len Catron published on January 9 an article in The New York Times (which we translate into Verne) and narrates how he fell in love with the help of 36 questions by psychologist Arthur Aron.

Although the writer used Aron's questions to fall in love and to fall in love with her, Aron put them in his study as a tool to generate intimacy, not necessarily loving, gradually. The aim was to help psychologists to create a close relationship in the context of a laboratory, so that it was possible to manipulate and study the variables of this relationship.

When Aron tested the questionnaire, he distributed some of the participants to couples of men and women. One of the couples who participated and met in this study ended up getting married six months later. As Aron explained to the magazine Wired, in 2010, “the last time I contacted them, they were still together”.

I mean, it is possible that this questionnaire, created for people to open up gradually, really works. We reproduce it below if anyone wants to test it (under their responsibility). The original study requires someone to be completely unknown. It is recommended to use 45 minutes: fifteen minutes for each set of questions, although both Mandy Len Catron how much these two volunteers from the The Guardian they needed more time. Participants must read aloud one question each, although both must answer all of them.

When they finish the questionnaire, the two should step aside and answer the questions asked by the researchers. The original study does not mention the need to look into the eyes for four minutes when they are finished, but it is not advisable: it worked for Mandy Len Catron.

group I

1. If you could choose anyone in the world, who would you invite to dinner?

2. Would you like to be famous? In what way?

3. Before making a phone call, do you rehearse what you are going to say? Why?

4. What would a perfect day look like for you?

5. When was the last time you sang alone? And for someone else?

6. If you could live to be 90 and have the body or mind of a 30-year-old during the last 60 years of your life, which of the two options would you choose?

7. Do you have a secret intuition of how you are going to die?

8. Say three things you believe you have in common with your interlocutor.

9. What aspects of your life are you most grateful for?

10. If you could change something about how you were brought up, what would it be?

11. Take four minutes to tell your partner the story of your life in as much detail as possible.

12. If tomorrow you could get up enjoying a new skill or quality, what would it be?

group II

13. If a crystal ball could tell the truth about you, your life, the future or anything else, what would you ask?

14. Is there anything you want to do for a long time? Why haven't you done it yet?

15. What is the greatest achievement you have achieved in your life?

16. What do you value most in a friend?

17. What is your most valuable memory?

18. What is your most painful memory?

19. If you knew you were going to die suddenly a year from now, would it change anything in your way of living? Why?

20. What does friendship mean to you?

21. How important is love and affection in your life?

22. Alternately share five characteristics that you consider positive in your partner.

23. Is your family close and loving? Do you think your childhood was happier than the others?

24. How do you feel about your mother?

Group III

25. Say three sentences using the pronoun "we". For example, "we are in this room feeling ..."

26. Complete this sentence: “I would like to have someone to share with…”.

27. If you were to end up being your partner's close friend, share with him or her something that it would be important for her to know.

28. Tell your partner what you like best about him or her. Be very honest and say things you wouldn't say to someone you just met.

29. Share an embarrassing moment in your life with your partner.

30. When was the last time you cried in front of someone? And alone?

31. Tell your interlocutor something you already like about him.

32. Is there something that is very serious and that you should not joke about?

33. If you were to die tonight without being able to speak to anyone, what would you regret not saying to someone? Why didn't you say so far?

34. Your house is on fire with all your things inside. After saving your loved ones and pets, you have time to make one last foray and save a single object. Which would you choose? Why?

35. Of all the people in your family, which death would be most painful for you? Why?

36. Share a personal problem and ask your interlocutor to tell you how he or she would have acted to solve it. Also ask how you think you feel about the problem you have reported.

To fall in love with anyone, do this: the article in which Mandy Len Catron tells how she found love thanks to these 36 questions.

SOURCE: https://brasil.elpais.com/brasil/2015/01/21/ciencia/1421860773_040293.html

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